8 SEO Trends for 2016: How to Achieve Google Success

2016 has arrived, it’s time to take stock of what worked and what didn’t in 2015, and then decide where to spend your time and money throughout 2016.We recently shared infographics about how video marketing and User Generated Content (UGC) were expected to continue their huge growth, and they are both predicted to be hot in 2016 by ZenContent. Find out what else is tipped to make the difference in 2016 in their infographic below.
8 SEO Trends for 2016 How to Achieve Google Success Next Year
http://blog.red-website-design.co.uk/2015/12/18/8-seo-trends-for-2016-how-to-achieve-google-success-next-year/

The Best Times to Post on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn & Other Social Media Sites

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Social media is one of the best ways to amplify the great content you’re creating. But it isn’t enough to just post content to social whenever you feel like it. Some times are better than others.

So … When’s the best time to post content to social media?

Unfortunately, there’s no perfect answer. Different businesses may find different days and times work best for them. In fact, timing often depends on the platform you’re using, how your target audience interacts with that platform, the region(s) you’re targeting, the content of your post (e.g. funny or serious), and your goals (e.g. clicks versus shares).

That being said, there is ample data out there on optimal times to post on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram. In the infographic below, we’ve pulled together data and research collected by the folks at CoSchedule from a variety of sources, including QuickSprout, SurePayroll, The Huffington Post, Buffer, TrackMaven, Fast Company, and KISSmetrics.

Think of this data as a general guideline, and use it to help you find the optimal posting times for your business.

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http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/best-times-post-pin-tweet-social-media-infographic

The Benefits of Business Blogs for Marketing

Why you should use blogging as a marketing tactic.

1) It Helps Drive Traffic to Your Website.

Raise your hand if you want more website visitors. Yeah, me too. Now think about the ways people find your website:
  • They could type your name right in to their browser, but that’s an audience you already have. They know who you are, you’re on their radar, and that doesn’t help you get more traffic on top of what you’re already getting.
  • You could pay for traffic by buying an email list (don’t you dare!), blasting them, and hoping some people open and click through on the emails. But that’s expensive and, you know, illegal.
  • You could pay for traffic by placing tons of paid ads, which isn’t illegal, but still quite expensive. And the second you run out of money, your traffic stops coming, too.
So, how can you drive any traffic? In short: blogging, social media, and search engines. Here’s how it works. Think about how many pages there are on your website. Probably not a ton, right? And think about how often you update those pages. Probably not that often, right? (How often can you really update your About Us page, you know?) Well, blogging helps solve both of those problems. Every time you write a blog post, it’s one more indexed page on your website, which means it’s one more opportunity for you to show up in search engines and drive traffic to your website in organic search. We’ll get into more of the benefits of blogging on your SEO a bit later, but it’s also one more cue to Google and other search engines that your website is active and they should be checking in frequently to see what new content to surface.
Blogging also helps you get discovered via social media. Every time you write a blog post, you’re creating content that people can share on social networks — Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Pinterest — which helps expose your business to a new audience that may not know you yet.
Blog content also helps keep your social media presence going — instead of asking your social media manager to come up with brand new original content for social media (or creating that content yourself), your blog can serve as that repository of content. You’re strengthening your social reach with blog content and driving new website visitors to your blog via your social channels. Quite a symbiotic relationship, if I do say so myself. So, the first benefit of blogging? It helps drive new traffic to your website and works closely with search engines and social media to do that.  
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2) It Helps Convert that Traffic into Leads.

Now that you have traffic coming to your website through your blog, you have an opportunity to convert that traffic into leads. Just like every blog post you write is another indexed page, each post is a new opportunity to generate new leads. The way this works is really simple: Just add a lead-generating call-to-action to every blog post. Often, these calls-to-action lead to things like free ebooks, free whitepapers, free fact sheets, free webinars, free trials … basically, any content asset for which someone would be willing to exchange their information. To be super clear for anyone unfamiliar with how traffic-to-lead conversions work, it’s as simple as this:  
  • Visitor comes to website
  • Visitor sees call-to-action for a free offer
  • Visitor clicks call-to-action and gets to a landing page, which contains a form for them to fill in with their information
  • Visitor fills out form, submits information, and receives the free offer
  If you scroll down in this blog post, you’ll see a call-to-action button. In fact, 99.9% of the blog posts we publish have call-to-action buttons … and yours should, too. That is how you turn that traffic coming to your blog into leads for your sales team.
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Note: Not every reader of your blog will become a lead. That’s okay. No one converts 100% of the people who read their blog into leads. Just get blogging, put calls-to-action on every blog post, set a visitor-to-lead conversion rate benchmark for yourself, and strive to improve that each month.  

3) It Helps Establish Authority.

The best business blogs answer common questions their leads and customers have. If you’re consistently creating content that’s helpful for your target customer, it’ll help establish you as an authority in their eyes. This is a particularly handy tool for Sales and Service professionals. Can you imagine the impact of sending an educational blog post you wrote to clear things up for a confused customer? Or how many more deals a salesperson could close if their leads discovered blog content written by their salesperson? “Establishing authority” is a fluffy metric — certainly not as concrete as traffic and leads, but it’s pretty powerful stuff. And if you need to tie the impact of blogging to a less fluffy metric, consider measuring it the same way you measure sales enablement. Because at the end of the day, that’s what many of your blog posts are. Think about the sales enablement opportunities blogging presents:  
  • If prospects find answers to their common questions via blog posts written by people at your company, they’re much more likely to come into the sales process trusting what you have to say because you’ve helped them in the past — even before they were interested in purchasing anything from you.
  • Prospects that have been reading your blog posts will typically enter the sales process more educated on your place in the market, your industry, and what you have to offer. That makes for a far more productive sales conversation than one held between two relative strangers.
  • Salespeople who encounter specific questions that require in-depth explanation or a documented answer can pull from an archive of blog posts. Not only do these blog posts help move the sales process along more swiftly than if a sales rep had to create the assets from scratch, but the salesperson is further positioned as a helpful resource to their prospect.
 

 

4) It Drives Long-Term Results.

You know what would be cool? If any of the following things helped you drive site traffic and generate new leads:
  • Trip to Hawaii
  • Going to the gym
  • Sleeping
Good news, though! That’s what blogging does — largely through search engines. Here’s what I mean: Let’s say you sit down for an hour and write and publish a blog post today. Let’s say that blog post gets you 100 views and 10 leads. You get another 50 views and 5 leads tomorrow as a few more people find it on social media and some of your subscribers get caught up on their email and RSS. But after a couple days, most of the fanfare from that post dies down and you’ve netted 150 views and 15 leads. It’s not done. That blog post is now ranking in search engines. That means for days, weeks, months, and years to come, you can continue to get traffic and leads from that blog post. So while it may feel like day one or bust, in reality, blogging acts more like this:
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So while you’re hitting your snooze alarm, surfing in Hawaii, and pumping iron, you’re also driving traffic and leads. The effort you put in yesterday can turn into hundreds of thousands of views and leads in the future. In fact, about 70% of the traffic each month on this very blog comes from posts that weren’t published in the current month. They come from old posts. Same goes for the leads generated in a current month — about 90% of the leads we generate every month come from blog posts that were published in previous months. Sometimes years ago. We call these types of blog posts “compounding” posts. Not every blog post will fit into this category, but the more evergreen blog posts you write, the more likely it is that you’ll land on one of those compounding blog posts. In our own research, we’ve found that about 1 in every 10 blog posts end up being compounding blog posts.
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To me (and hopefully to you), this demonstrates the scalability of business blogging. While you might not see immediate results, over time, you’ll be able to count on a predictable amount of traffic and leads for your business without any additional resource investment — the work to generate that traffic and those leads is already done.

Secondary Benefits of Business Blogging

There are other reasons businesses might want to blog, but I think they’re smaller and stray from the core benefits of blogging. For instance, I love to use our blog to test out big campaigns on the cheap — before we invest a lot of money and time into their creation. I also love to use our blog to help understand our persona better. And while this shouldn’t be their primary use, blogs also become great outlets through with marketers can communicate other PR-type important information — things like product releases or event information. It’s certainly easier to get attention for more company-focused initiatives if you’ve built up your own audience on your own property, as opposed to pitching your story to journalists and hoping one of them bites. These are all great side effects or uses of a business blog, but they’re secondary benefits to me. If you’re looking to start a business blog or get more investment for one you’ve already started, the reasons above are a great place to start arguing your case. http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/the-benefits-of-business-blogging-ht

9 Web Design Tips for 2016: How to Cater for Every Type of Visitor

In the pyramid of factors affecting exposure, one of the core elements is shutter speed. Each factor comes with its idiosyncracies and shutter speed is no exception. Just as the ISO and aperture can make or break a photo, shutter speed plays an essential role in the resulting image.

What is Shutter Speed?

On all DSLRs (and many mirrorless cameras) with a mechanical shutter, there is a shutter curtain right in front of the sensor. This curtain opens and closes with each picture taken. When the shutter curtain is open, light reaches the sensor, creating the image. Shutter speed is basically the amount of time for which the curtain remains open.

The Shutter Speed Range

Setting your camera to default mode (not Bulb) will allow you to record a shutter speed of up to 30 seconds. The shortest possible shutter speed depends on the camera model and it ranges from 1/1000 to 1/8000 of a second. The shorter the shutter speed, the less light will reach the sensor.

Photo by Ryan McKee

If you want shutter speeds longer than 30 seconds, you’ll have to use the Bulb mode on the camera (often marked with just a “B”). This lets you set some extremely long exposures. The only downside is that you’ll have to keep the shutter release button pressed all the way down for the duration you want your exposure to be. This will introduce shake if you do it on the camera itself, but it’s really easy if you use a remote shutter cable. Obviously, you’ll need a tripod to do this.

The Effects of Different Shutter Speeds

Shutter speed is one of the main factors affecting image sharpness. Motion is just about inevitable. Sometimes the issue may be a shaky hand because you’re not using a tripod and many times the motion is the fault of your subject. Fast shutter speeds will take care of that as the faster the shutter speed is, the sharper the image is going to be. Because faster shutter speeds freeze motion, they can even be used creatively for a vast range of scenarios. Bullet time photos, for example, are done with fast shutter speeds.

Photo by Max Schrader

You can use a slower shutter speed to intentionally add motion to a photo. Use slower shutter speeds to add motion blur, do panning, create light painting images, track star trails, and so forth. When using longer shutter speeds, everything that moves will gradually leave a trace of light (or shadow) in the image.


Photo by darkday

When shooting landscapes on tripods, especially with full frame cameras, keep in mind that the mirror flipping up before the shutter is released often creates some vibration that can affect the sharpness of the photo. When possible, use mirror lockup which will raise the mirror before releasing the shutter curtain. The time between raising the mirror and releasing the curtain is longer, thus eliminating the vibration.

The Shutter Speed vs. Focal Length Rule Of Thumb

As mentioned earlier, longer shutter speeds are prone to producing blurry images due to movement. Fortunately, you can easily remember a simple rule-of-thumb for making your photos as sharp as possible: double the focal length to determine the minimum shutter speed that should accompany it. So if you are using a 100mm lens, then the minimal shutter speed of your hand-held would 1/200th of a second. If the lens has a built-in stabilizer, then it’s best to set the minimum at half of the focal length. This being the case, a 100mm image stabilized lens would put the recommended minimum shutter speed at around 1/50th of a second.

Photo by Giuseppe Milo

Shutter Curtain Actuations

The shutter assembly is the one thing that wears down with usage. After a certain number of shots, it can fail and need replacing. This applies to every camera with a shutter curtain. For the entry level DSLRs, the shutter is rated for around 100,000 actuations. Midrange cameras and most of the professional-grade cameras are rated for about 150,000 shutter actuations while the highest grade cameras (Canon 1Dx, Nikon 4Ds, Canon 7D Mark II, and so on) are rated for around 200,000 actuations. When the shutter fails, it doesn’t mean that your camera is dead – the shutter just has to be replaced. This usually costs much less than buying a new camera.


The Top Marketing Trends to Watch for in 2016

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Marketing is a fast-moving industry by nature. Like most years, a whole lot has happened in the marketing world in 2015. 

Marketing is becoming more localized and more personalized. Snapchat has exceeded many marketers’ expectations, now getting 4 billion video views per day — the same number as Facebook. We’re seeing a rise in wearable tech, which is giving marketers a ton more consumer data to work with.


It’s time to put these changes into perspective as we enter a brand new year. To help us stay ahead of the marketing trends in 2016, the folks at Microsoft and Column Five created the infographic below. Check it out to learn about the biggest trends marketers should know about as we strategize for the upcoming year.

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http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/marketing-trends-next-year