A Simple Guide to Successful Email Outreach

Anatomy_of_an_Outreach_Email.jpg

On any given day, the average businessperson receives 91 emails, according to a report by The Radicati Group.  This number is expected to rise to 95 emails per person per day by next year, and reach almost 100 by 2018.

That’s a lot of email.

While it’s no secret that we all know how to send email, the newer challenge is figuring out a way to actually receive a response from the people we’re sending these emails to. With all of those emails taking up space in their inbox, how can we reach out in a more meaningful way to ensure our messages are heard?

This is a bit of a loaded question, as there’s a lot to consider when sending a proper outreach email: subject lines, send times, email length … the list goes on.

To help answer this question, check out the infographic below from Online Course Report. They’ve detailed everything from what day and time is the best for sending outreach email to how many attempts you can expect to send.

anatomy_of_email_outreach-1.jpg

http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/anatomy-email-outreach

A Visual Guide to the Science of Twitter Success

science-of-twitter.jpgAfter years of trying to understand the ins and outs of using Twitter for business — from hashtag best practices to running paid campaigns — many marketers have been left wondering … “Does any of this Twitter stuff actually work? Where are the numbers? Where’s the science?!”

At long last, we’ve been able to uncover the answers to these questions. And with the help of our friends at Audiense (formerly SocialBro), we’ve created an infographic that showcases the science behind achieving Twitter success.

In the infographic below, you’ll find a host of stats that can help you to better understand where you should be allocating your Twitter resources and what tactics you could be using to expand your reach. Let’s dive in …

Twitter_Success_Infographic.jpg

http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/science-of-twitter-success

How to Customize Your Facebook Page: 7 Tips and Tricks

customize-your-facebook-page.jpg

As the hub of your business presence on a (nearly) 1.6 billion-person social network, your Facebook Page has the potential to be a valuable marketing asset. From educating prospective customers to sharing company updates and educational resources with your existing customers, you can use your Facebook Page to target nearly every stage of your marketing funnel.

But in a world where 40 million+ small businesses have Facebook Pages, simply creating a Page won’t guarantee you much in the way of results.

In order to attract and engage your target audience, you need your Facebook Page to stand out from the sea of sameness.

To help you get started, we put together this list of seven tips and tricks you can use for customizing your company’s Facebook Page.

7 Ways to Create a Custom Facebook Business Page

1) Claim Your Custom URL

First things first: If you haven’t already, head to the URL facebook.com/username and create a custom URL for your Facebook Page that’s short and easy to remember. The goal is to create alignment between your brand and the Page.

As you can see in the screenshots below, you first need to choose your Page from a dropdown menu, then you’ll be able to see if the URL you want is available.

custom-url-available.png

custom-URL-1.png

Keep in mind that you’re only allowed to change your Facebook Page URL once. So if you’re going to update it, choose your new URL wisely.

2) Control Who Gets to See Your Page

settings-4.png

Head to the Settings menu (via the link on the right side of your Page’s top nav), and you’ll be able to unlock a host of customization options. Perhaps the most important: The ability to restrict the visibility of your Page, which you can control under the “General” settings tab.

Are there certain countries your company doesn’t sell to? You can prevent your Facebook Page from appearing there. Sell a product (e.g., alcohol) that has legal restrictions and/or that is otherwise geared toward an adult audience? You can restrict the visibility of your Facebook Page according to age.

page-visibility.png

By fine-tuning these visibility settings, you can help make sure your Page is reaching the right audience.

3) Control What Content Appears on Your Page

While you’re in the General Settings menu customizing your Facebook Page’s visibility settings, you might also want to consider customizing what content will be allowed to appear on your Page. Specifically, you can control who’s allowed to post content to your Page, as well as what types of content (e.g., videos and/or photos) people are — or aren’t — allowed to post.

Worried about bad language or inappropriate topics popping up in posts and replies on your Page? Adjust your Page Moderation settings to block the use of specific words, and turn on (or increase) your Page’s Profanity Filter. FYI: There are three Profanity Filter settings, “Off,” “Medium,” and “Strong,” which are based on the words and phrases that Facebook users have most frequently deemed offensive.

page-content-control.png

4) Add a Call-to-Action Button

It’s a little tweak that can make a big impact: Setting up a call-to-action (CTA) button on your Facebook Page. The best part is that it only takes a few seconds to do.

If you haven’t already created a CTA for your Page, you’ll see an “Add Action Button” button where your future CTA will appear. (And yes, I realize how meta it is to be clicking on a CTA that’s telling you to create a CTA. Welcome to the weird world of online marketing.)

add-action-button.png

Once you click that button, you’ll be taken to a menu where you can select the CTA you want and preview it across different devices.

create-cta-facebook-page.png

The CTA you choose should depend on the specific goals you’re trying to accomplish. Facebook gives you 11 different options:

  • “Contact Us”
  • “Book Now”
  • “Call Now”
  • “Send Message”
  • “Use App”
  • “Play Game”
  • “Shop Now”
  • “Sign Up”
  • “Watch Video”
  • “Send Email”
  • “Learn More”

In addition to having your Page CTA redirect to a webpage, you can specify that it sends mobile visitors to your app or a mobile version of your site. Sure, it’s a minor adjustment, but the end result is a better experience for your visitors.

mobile-visitors-facebook-page

However you end up configuring your CTA, remember to use tracking links when redirecting people to one of your other properties. That way you can monitor how successful your CTA has been at generating traffic and leads.

5) Customize Your Page’s Tabs

tabs-facebook-page.png

You can customize your Facebook Page’s tabs at a basic level by navigating to the “More” tab and selecting “Manage Tabs” from the dropdown menu. From there, you’ll be able to re-position the order in which your Page’s tabs appear.

custom-tabs-facebook.png

Clicking that “Add or Remove Tabs” link at the bottom of the Manage Tabs menu will take you to Facebook’s Apps menu, where you can install new apps. Once you install the app — like the Notes app, for example — you’ll be able to feature it as a tab on your Page.

add-apps.png

To create an entirely unique, non-Facebook-app-related tab for your Page, there’s a bit of a development rabbit hole you’ll need to go down. While it’s not impossible to do, it’s definitely tricky.

6) Use Custom Images

Facebook recommends “adding big, beautiful photos and images” to your Facebook Page. In a perfect world, this would entail having a photographer take some high-quality shots — or having a graphic designer create some custom images — that highlight your company’s products, services, branding, culture, and so on.

You could also go the Patagonia Facebook Page route and combine photos with design work, like you see in the examples below.

patagonia-example-1.jpg

patagonia-example-3.jpg

Regardless of the types of images you end up using, make sure you stick to Facebook’s recommended image dimensions. Here they are:

  • Profile picture: 180 x 180 pixels (at least)
  • Cover photo: 851 pixels wide x 315 pixels tall (JPG file format / less than 100KB file size.

7) Add Ratings & Reviews to Your Page

Know how some Facebook Pages have those little rating and review widgets with the stars?

ratings-and-reviews.png

Those will only appear if you’ve designated your Page as a local business during setup and have entered your full business address. If you’re creating a new Page, don’t worry: this option is hard to miss.

local-business.png

If you already have a Facebook Page and want to make the switch to the local business setting, head to the About tab, choose Page Info, and then hover over the Category section. Click on the little pencil icon that appears and you’ll be able to switch your page to the “Local Businesses” category.

change-category-local-business.png

Assuming you have your business’s full address already entered in, Facebook’s Ratings & Reviews functionality should soon become available on your Page.

http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/26267/8-Creative-Ways-to-Customize-Your-Facebook-Business-Page.aspx

How to Increase Ecommerce Sales Without Offering Silly Discounts

sales-15810_1920

Does your Ecommerce website only generate sales when you offer massive discounts? Do those customers disappear once your prices are back to normal?

If discounted prices are hurting your bottom line follow these tips from Slant Marketing.

How to Increase Ecommerce Sales Without Offering Silly Discountshttps://blog.red-website-design.co.uk/2016/03/08/how-to-increase-ecommerce-sales-without-offering-silly-discounts/

7 Ways to Use Pinterest to Promote Your Business

Image centric social networks are rapidly gaining market share due to their high engagement levels.

Everyone apparently loves an enticing photo.7 Ways to Use Pinterest to Market Your Business

Pinterest has become the social media network to watch after growing over 4,000% in the last 6 months.

At an average of 88.3 minutes per visitor it ranks third on engagement behind Facebook and Tumblr and well ahead of LinkedIn (16 minutes) and Google Plus (5.1 minutes).

Pinterest is a social network with a simple premise: Users share photos that they find online by “pinning” them, the equivalent of “liking” a status on Facebook or giving a +1 on Google. Users have to download a toolbar that can be used to pin items from any Web site. The photo and information then appear on your Pinterest board, and users who follow you can see your collection of photos and even re-pin them if they like them. The simplicity of this system does not lend itself to obvious marketing strategies, but there are a number of ways that you can use this growing social network to promote your business:

1. Share Your Products

The most obvious way to use Pinterest for your business is to pin your own products to share with other users. There are a few ways that you can leverage this strategy for the most benefit. Since you can create several boards, it is best to group your pins into product categories for specific customers, such as items for moms, kids, artists, and others. Doing so creates a virtual product catalog of interest to these consumers or for gift ideas for these groups. You can also create a “best of” board, showing off your most popular products.

7 Ways to Use Pinterest to Promote Your Business

2. Add to Gifts

When you create an entry for your pins, you can add a price tag. When you select this option, you can then add a link, pointing back to your Web site. Items added in this way are automatically included in the “gifts” section on Pinterest, which is a virtual catalog of gift ideas. Be sure to select your best photos for pinning, and include an evocative description.

3. Highlight Services

Not every business sells products. Pinterest is still a useful marketing tool for these businesses. If you provide a service, you can create a kind of visual resume with Pinterest. For example, if you design Web sites, you can pin a screenshot of a home page. If you are a graphic designer, you can pin samples of your work. If you offer other services, such as consulting or writing work, you can use Pinterest to share photos that inspire or that share a message about your work. For example, financial consultants could pin to photos that represent client goals, such as financial independence or financing education. Non-profit groups can share photos of the clients they are helping.

Pinterest for selling services

4. Maximize SEO Efforts

When you pin your products, you have an opportunity to maximize your SEO strategy and to drive trafic back to your site. You create quality backlinks whenever you or other users link to your products. When you write descriptions, you can use your targeted keywords, which will attract your target customers and encourage them to visit your site. You can share your pins on other social networks like Facebook and Twitter, encouraging more links to your products. All of these efforts will help to drive more traffic to your site and to increase your search-engine ranking.

5. Offer Added Value

Savvy social-networking users can easily identify a profile that is designed primarily to market products and services, and they are likely to avoid these profiles. Offer other users more reasons to visit your profile by offering them added value. Pin to other products and services that will benefit them, but that also complement your own products and services. For example, if you create custom wedding gowns, you can link to other bridal accessories or to beautiful wholesale fabrics. If you are a Web designer, you can link to useful tech gadgets.

6. Offer Exclusive Content

Encourage users to interact with you on Pinterest and to visit your Web site by offering exclusive content. You can hold contests by asking users to re-pin your items for each “entry.” The more items are re-pinned, the more buzz you will build around your products and your site. You can also offer exclusive discounts or other promotions by using a QR code or other tactics.

7. Engage with Users

Pinterest is a social network, so take the time to form relationships with other users and to build a community around your brand. When you see that users have re-pinned your items, comment and thank them. Follow other users, and this will encourage them to follow you in return. Ask for customer feedback by encouraging them to re-pin their favorite products in your catalog. The more you can do to encourage customer interaction, the better relationship you will have with them.

With the number of Pinterest users growing rapidly — as much as 4,000 percent in the last six months — the site is quickly becoming a dominant player in the social-networking field. Finding ways to leverage this site to promote your business is important to your overall marketing strategy.

How to Sell on Pinterest - Infographic http://www.jeffbullas.com/2012/02/02/7-ways-to-use-pinterest-to-promote-your-business/