Improve Your Website’s Performance With These Photo Optimization Tips

stopwatch

Much has been written lately about slow page loading times on news websites. People are increasingly consuming news on mobile devices, often with limited bandwidth.

Earlier this year, Google announced that they now use “mobile-friendliness” as a ranking signal in mobile search results and even adding an extra second or two of load time has been shown to increase abandonment rates on websites.

Sites that aren’t optimizing for performance on all devices and connection speeds are limiting their own audience growth. Every time someone can’t find your site or they’re too impatient to wait for a page to load, you’re losing a potential reader.

Fortunately, the INN Nerds aren’t content to just complain about it, we’re here to help fix it!

Let’s Start with Photos

The average web page now weighs in at just under 2 MB, and images are the main culprit. Photos on the web are essential elements of storytelling and connecting with your audience. But if your photos aren’t optimized, they can also weigh down your web pages and make them slow to load. To improve the overall performance of your website, photo optimization is a great place to start.

What is Photo Optimization

Photo optimization involves compressing the file size of photo using a tool like Adobe Photoshop. We want the highest quality photo with the smallest possible file size. Too much compression can impair the quality of the image. Too little compression can result in a large photo file size which slows the performance of our web page. Optimization is finding the right balance between quality and file size.

Consider these two images:

Photo of Delicate Arch

Not Optimized. Width: 1200px, Height: 800px, File Size: 939 Kilobytes

Delicate Arch in Arches National Park

Optimized. Width: 1200px, Height: 800px, File Size: 107 Kilobytes

The second photo has a file size of less than 12 percent of the first. You can probably see a slight degradation in the photo quality. But most people would not notice the difference between these two on a web page.

On the web we should never use any photo with a file size like 939 Kilobytes. This will slow the loading of the page, especially on slower connections and mobile devices. We want to keep website photos under 100 KB if we can, and much lower for smaller images. For example, here’s the same photo reduced in dimensions:

Delicate Archive in Arches National Park

Not Optimized. Width: 300px, Height: 200px, File Size: 192 Kilobytes

Delicate Arch in Arches National Park

Optimized. Width: 300px, Height: 200px, File Size: 14 Kilobytes

The file size of the second photo is less that 10 percent of the first image, yet most people would see no difference in photo quality. If you have a web page displaying a number of similar-sized images, for example a gallery page or a series of stories with thumbnail images, smaller photo file sizes can add up a huge reduction in page loading time.

How to Optimize Photos in Photoshop

Best practice for optimization is to start with the highest-quality source photo, then resize and compress it for the web. Start by cropping and resizing the photo for the space it will fill on your web page. If the photo will be displayed in a sidebar widget that’s 300px wide, there’s no reason to upload a photo wider than 300px for that space. Reducing the size of the photo by itself will reduce its file size.

After the photo is cropped and sized, in the File menu go to Export -> Save for Web:

Save for Web dialogue box in Photoshop

Here you can select which photo format to export (always use JPEG for photos), and how much compression to apply. Medium is often the optimum setting, but this is a judgement call. If you don’t see a preview of both the Original photo and the JPEG export, click the 2-Up tab at the top. Now you can try different compression settings and see a preview of the results, including the file size:

Optimized image in Save for Web dialogue in Photoshop

Once you’re happy with the image quality and file size reduction, click Save to create your web-optimized photo. This will not affect your original image, which should be archived for possible use in the future..

Tip: If you like keyboard shortcuts, in Photoshop you can launch Save for Web like this:

  • Command + Shift + Option + s (Mac)
  • Control + Shift + Alt + s (Windows)

Optimizing Photos without Photoshop

If you don’t use Photoshop, there are any number of other tools for optimizing website images.

Compressor.io is a free online tool. You can drag and drop a source photo into it, and download a compressed version of the image. Compressor.io doesn’t have any cropping or resizing tools, and you can’t adjust the amount of compression. In our tests, Photoshop does a better job of balancing photo quality and file size. But if you have a photo sized correctly for your website, it’ll do in a pinch.

If you’re comfortable using the command line, there are a number of tools available to you for optimizing different image types.

Your Photo Workflow

If you’ve produced photos for print, you know it’s important to maintain the highest quality photo throughout the process. But with today’s cameras, the highest quality photo is likely to be 5000 pixels wide, and more than 20 Megabytes in file size. Such a photo is great for print, but a problem on the web.

Best practice is to safely store the original photo files in their highest resolution, for the day when you need to resize or reuse them in another context. Use the original photos to crop, size, and export for the web, then keep the originals safe for future use.

https://nerds.inn.org/2015/11/23/improving-website-performance-optimizing-photos/

7 Tips to Boost Your Site’s Conversion Rate Using Images

Images not only add life to a website, they also make it convert better. People no longer want to browse a website – they want to experience it. Using the right images can boost your site’s conversions and get you to connect better with your target audience.

However, you still find many websites unaware of the importance of images when it comes to getting the most out of existing traffic. Below are some proven tips to help you boost your conversion rate by intelligently using images throughout your website.

Tip 1 – Emotions Rule

Many people buy for emotional reasons. If you make them feel just right, they’ll take action. The same rule applies when choosing images for your site. A positive image brings out positive emotions. It could be a smile, a smirk or a gesture. Emotions are powerful, and they work.

Your customers and prospects aren’t stupid. They know what you’re trying to convey, they see it. Make them feel good, happy, proud, wanted – they’ll agree with you and connect better. The perks of leveraging emotions can be very powerful, but it’s how you do it that matters.

human touch homepage conversionsHuman Touch is a company that sells massage and wellness products. Their website very intelligently uses images to convey their message. They’re not only showing the product, but are also letting their customers get a feel of it.

The image used here clearly expresses joy and happiness. It gives their prospects a fair idea of what they can be experiencing. They could have simply shown pictures of the chair without someone using it, but they took it a step further to show the relaxing effect of the product.

Tip 2 – Consider Using A Mascot

Ever noticed your favorite site with a little cartoon? Site mascots are highly popular these days. Websites and blogs are using them for branding. They are being used to create a bonding experience with the visitors. They’re helping sites create a strong image in their audience’s mind. But how does a mascot help you convert better? Here are a few ways:

I. A mascot can solidify your marketing motif.

seomoz moz bot mascotII. A mascot can have a much more memorable branding effect:

western exterminator co mascotIII. It’s much easier to create a desired emotional effect:

mailchimp connected mascot

Look around, you’ll find sites with various types of mascots. Most of these sites are successful. And it doesn’t even cost you a lot to get it done for your site. Lots of creative designers out there will agree to create one for you at an affordable price.

mailchimp homepage image and conversionsIf you’re an online marketer, you should know Mail Chimp – a highly successful email marketing service. The company has managed to capture a fair share of the market in a short span of time. And that’s largely due to the quality of their service and the impactful imagery used in their branding.

Tip 3 – Give Your Images A Human Touch

Boost your website’s conversion rate by using human faces. They get your prospects to focus more and this causes them to draw towards a common point of interest. It doesn’t get more real than that.

Medalia Art is a site that sells art. Nothing spectacular about that, but the photo versus painting test they did is worth noticing. The website, which is an online art shop, presents paintings from various artists right on their homepage. During their A/B testing, they swapped the paintings with the photo of the artist. Their aim was to have an increased user engagement.

Medalia Art Image Conversion Experiment

Paintings swapped with human photos.

Making this small but relevant change sent their conversion rate through the roof – something they didn’t expect. Their site experienced a whopping 95% increase in conversions!.

Tip 4 – Think Out Of The Box

Today’s technology allows you to do so much more – leverage it.  You are only limited by your imagination. People want to see something new, even on websites. Make your website scream “I’m different” with your images.

due maternity product conversionsDue Maternity, an online retailer targeted towards pregnant women, knows what it means to think out of the box. In order to give their prospects a real feel of their products, they did something unique. Using advanced “dynamic image technology”, the website used images that you can spin around – 360 degrees.

The result? The pages that had these rotating images outperformed the standard two dimensional ones. And their conversion rate for these particular products increased by 27% – all because of a simple twist.

Tip 5 – Show Validation

What makes TV commercials work? Models, actors, and random people are shown using the product. Praising it, loving it, and going bonkers. That’s what make these commercials tick. But the more important question is: Why does this work?

It’s simple – people want a third opinion. They want to feel safe before buying something/anything. They want to be convinced. They don’t want to make a wrong decision. When they see others happy with a product, they get convinced.

If your website has pictures of your happy customers, your conversion grows. It’s a natural process that will never change. Add a dash of testimonials along with their pictures and voila – chances are your conversion rate will automatically go up.

infusion soft homepage conversionsInfusionsoft is a company that sells a complete sales and marketing software tool for small businesses. Their website is professional and well placed. They’ve strategically used images of customers along with their testimonials on their homepage.

They didn’t hide their customer photos somewhere deep down. Why? Because they know how to make their prospects feel at home by showing how trustworthy their product is. Something that’s essential to grow your conversion rate.

Tip 6 – It’s About THEM, Not You

If you want a higher conversion rate, perfect the art of choosing images. Your prospects are interested in themselves. He or she doesn’t care about your product or company. It’s the ‘me’ factor that ultimately does the magic. Show your visitors they are on the right track. Make them feel comfortable. Get them to experience what you want them to. That will open up doors and get more people to like you – buy from you.

coconut bliss homepage conversionsCoconut Bliss sells ice cream. But they’re different, they’re approach is new. Their product looks and feels more personal than commercial. They call it the evolution of ice cream.

This reflects in their website’s design, and the images they used. A very natural picture of a couple enjoying their ice cream. The pictures used on their homepage are relevant and professionally done. If you’re an ice-creamoholic you’d be very interested in what they’re offering. Just because the site uses the right pictures to communicate the right ideas. They didn’t use any pictures to ‘decorate’ their site, but meaningful ones.

Tip 7 – Stop Using Bad Stock Photos

The 90’s are gone. The web 1.0 era has ended. This is the social age of the Internet. People don’t look at the web like they used to. They’re more connected than ever. And educated. What does that have to do with images and conversions?

People can tell if you’ve used a cheesy stock photos.

They used to be a rage back then, but not now. Your prospects will know you’re trying to fool them with people shaking hands in suits.

So in order to get a higher conversion rate today, you need to do the opposite. Choose stock photos intelligently – even if you have to spend more money.

Your site has to look professional enough to convert better. If the stock photos you go for look obvious, you get a thumbs down from your visitors. Not good. Your aim should be to send a positive message to your audience. Be smart and go for stock photos that you know will be right for your site, in every way.

mcafee homepage imageWho isn’t familiar with McAfee, provider of security and anti-virus solutions? Do you see how they’ve used an overpowering image on their homepage? Something that not only relates to their message, but also looks professional.

What they used is a high quality image, which may or may not be a stock photo, but it does not look staged, or cheesy. It looks real and authentic, and is adding real substance to the site. Bottom line: using the right stock photos on your own site can make a difference to your conversion rate.

Don’t Forget To Test Your Changes

The tips described above are to help you get headed in the right direction. Whenever you feel it’s time to make a change to your website, be sure to test your changes with testing software.

https://blog.kissmetrics.com/boost-conversions-using-images/

The Anatomy of a Perfect Checkout Page

The-anatomy-of-a-perfect-checkout-page-V2-min.png.pagespeed.ce.OALmBQNp2i

 

So you’ve spent time, money and effort creating your online shop. Your landing page is engaging, your product descriptions are tempting and your product photos are spot on. You have a steady stream of traffic coming to your site – but are your sales figures matching up?

If not, it might be time to optimize your checkout process.

Your checkout process is that last hurdle before visitors into customers, so it’s crucial to get it right. According to the Baymard Institute, 68.83% of online shopping carts are abandoned. That’s a huge missed opportunity that could potentially be recovered.

So what makes the perfect checkout page?

Perfection varies according to your product and audience. Imagine buying a high-end designer item versus buying office stationery. You’ll want to dwell over one purchase while pay using a one-click button for the other. No two eCommerce websites are alike, and so no two checkout processes should be either.

The only way to find your own version of ‘perfection’ is to continuously test to see what works. It’s imperative to explore the possibilities in a planned way – with A/B testing.

You simply create an alternative version of  your checkout page and compare it against the original to see which produces the best results. The benefit of testing is that you get data that tells you which version works better before committing to any major changes. A/B tests can be as simple as changing a few words to altering the entire layout.

Here are some ideas to get started:

Test for Checkout Page Usability

  • Is the information ordered logically?
  • Are instructions on forms clear?
  • Are there any distractions?
  • Is the text big enough?

Test for Psychological Triggers on Checkout Page

  • Are there visual cues of security?
  • Is the progress bar obvious enough?
  • Are the images large enough?
  • Does the colour scheme work?

VWO’s repository of over 150 case studies is a good starting point for those who want to see what others are testing. But every retailer is different – so look at your own findings and data to see what you should try.

Fine-tuning the checkout process takes time and experimentation. Get it right and you’ll end up with happy customers who will be coming back for more. Get it wrong and your tests will only point you in the right direction.

We’ve put together this handy infographic that pinpoints the key elements to a successful checkout page which can help when planning your testing process. Don’t rely on luck and guesses – test, plan and strategically experiment with your process to ensure your sales match up with your web traffic.

ecommerce_infographic

 

https://vwo.com/blog/anatomy-perfect-checkout-page/

50+ Easy to Follow Web Design Guidelines for a More Successful Website

Are you considering launching a new website? Or perhaps you’re always on the lookout for tips to improve your existing site?

When it comes to creating a user friendly, high converting website there are many things to consider. There’s the site navigation and page layout, the written and visual content, and perhaps more importantly there’s SEO.

For some help getting each of those plus more right take a look at this infographic from Karim Khalaf.

50+ Easy to Follow Tips for a More Successful Small Business Website

 

http://blog.red-website-design.co.uk/2015/12/04/50-easy-to-follow-web-design-guidelines-for-a-more-successful-website/

11 Quick Food Photography Tips to Make Mouth Watering Images

One of my first jobs in photography involved shooting food, including doing shots for a cookbook. I learned a lot about food styling and choosing the right props. If you’ve ever needed to take some food photographs or think this is something you might want to try, here’s a few quick tips for you to get started.  Feel free to add your own tips or ask questions.

Food Photography Tips

 

#1 – PICK THE FRESHEST INGREDIENTS



If the skin looks wrinkled, scarred or damaged take it out and get a new one – or angle it in a such way so as not to see the bad side. This seem obvious but sometimes it’s easy to miss. You’re often photographing these things really close up so even the tiniest flaws will show up. Check them over closely and be ruthless when you buy our vegetables.

quinoa-salad

#2 -LIGHTING IS EVERYTHING!


Backlight is key to texture and making it appetizing looking. This will also allow any steam to show up in the image.  Steam or smoke will show up prominently when lit from behind. Notice how much more appetizing the corn and bean salad looks in the second image, and the only difference is the angle of light. The one that has the light skimming across it from behind makes the salad look crisp and fresh, the other one just seems flat and unappealing.

_MG_2962-600px
Lighting from the front and to camera right, notice how flat it seems?

_MG_2969-600px
Lighting from behind makes the salad glisten and look more appealing to the eye.

_MG_0703-600px
Dramatic lighting doesn’t have to be fancy, this was shot on my kitchen floor using light from the patio window.

#3 – KEEP IT SIMPLE


Take out stuff you don’t need. Take out things on the table that are distracting and pair down to just one plate of food.  If the food once cooked is unattractive only show a portion of it. Brown soup doesn’t really seem visually stimulating but if you have to do something with it, get creative with props and cropping and when in doubt follow the “more is less” rule of thumb.

QuinoaKaleSoup

#4 – USE SIMPLE PROPS INCLUDING RAW INGREDIENTS


Simple plates, cutlery, etc. and raw ingredients make great extra props. When I did a lot of food photography I had a cupboard full of different plates, placements and bowls, but only one of each!  Stick to non-patterned plates and bowls so the food stands out more.

If you don't have props use raw food bits
If you don’t have props use raw food bits.

#5 – SHOW A BEFORE AND AFTER SHOT


Showing steps in the cooking process including chopping, in the pot or in process helps people understand the final image. Show one shot before, and one after it’s cooked or step by step images. This works well for things that just don’t look all that great cooked.

Super green soup in the pot before blending shows the ingredients well.
Super green soup in the pot before blending shows the ingredients well.

super-green-soup
After blending it doesn’t look like much so use the before and after, and prop with raw ingredients to help its appeal.

#6 – SHOW IT COOKING


Along the lines of #5 showing it cooking is sometimes better than showing the finished product.

_MG_0774-600px
In the pot and human element added. This was actually photographed on my deck in mid-winter. Can you guess what the background is?

#7 – ADD A HUMAN ELEMENT


Adding a hand stirring a pot or holding a plate allows you to show scale and adds a human element which is often more appealing and real to viewers.  (see photo above)

#8 – DON’T COOK IT COMPLETELY


When meats and vegetables are fully cooked they keep cooking after you remove them from the heat. So to keep them looking plump and juicy remove them from the stove or oven a bit early – take your photos, then put it back it to finish cooking before you eat it. This will keep things from looking shrivelled.

#9 – KEEP THE PLATES CLEAN


This goes without saying, but I’ll say it anyway. The plates and props holding the food must be absolutely 100% pristine, clean, flaw free. When you shoot close up, like most food requires, any imperfections will show up and look like the dish is messy or incomplete.  Like this one.

Oops!  I should have cleaned the pot better.
Oops! I should have cleaned the pot better. Notice how messy it looks?

#10 – VARY YOUR CAMERA ANGLE


Try different angles of view when shooting your food items from directly overhead, tilted, shooting into the edge of the plate or table, and so on.  Get creative and try to show it in a different way than most people would see it.

A little tilt and diagonal lines just adds interest. Notice the back lighting again?
A little tilt and diagonal lines just adds interest. Notice the back lighting again?

#11 – ADD A BIT OF OIL


To make vegetables glisten brush them with a bit of olive oil, or mist a salad with water. It will make them look fresher.

_MG_3009-600px
These veggies were marinated in oil and herbs so notice how they glisten so nicely?

#12 – BONUS TIP FOOD SHOTS EATING OUT


Yup I’m one of those people that takes a photo of my food before I eat it, especially if it’s particularly nicely presented. I feel I owe it to the chef who took such great care in preparing it. Perhaps it my food photography background and I just can’t help myself!  I often just use my iPhone but when I do have my camera I will usually set it up before I eat it and take a few shots.  Here’s a couple of mine.

Okay let’s see how you put this to use!

Portland2012-0269-600px
French toast at the Byway Diner in Portland, Oregon.

Indulgence-600px
Cafe latte and beignets at Cafe Du Monde in New Orleans

How Advertising Makes Us Buy

According to a recent study from Microsoft, people lose concentration after eight seconds. To put that into perspective, that’s one second less than the attention span of a goldfish.

Now factor in the absurd amount of ad exposure we encounter everyday, and it’s no wonder why so many businesses are struggling to get their message heard.

As marketers and advertisers, it seems the odds couldn’t be any less in our favor.

So what’s the solution?

Well, the answer breaks down into four parts. To learn more about each, check out the following infographic from WebpageFX on how businesses are using this approach to convince people to buy.

Buy


http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/advertising-makes-us-buy

10 Essential Features of a Successful Small Business Website

How successful is your small business website? Are you looking for areas in which you can improve usability and results?

For most small businesses your website will act as your salesman (except it works 24/7 and won’t ask for commission). It’s where customers will find out about the services you offer and effectively decide if they want to buy from you, so it needs to be right in order to make you a success.

For some guidance making your website work better for you take a look at this infographic from Add People.

10 Essential Features of a Successful Small Business Website

Things to Know About Protecting Your Images Online

It is the digital age and therefore vitally important to have a presence on the internet. Photographers, both professional and novice, are using the internet more than ever to showcase their skill.
 
Photo by Maja Petric
Photo by Maja Petric

This is imperative from a business and marketing standpoint, but with every great tool comes those who exploit it. Photographers are stuck between marketing themselves in the most essential way available and putting their products at risk to be stolen online.
 
Other than keeping photos off the internet completely, the options for keeping our property entirely safe are limited. Here are the things you should know about protecting your images online before clicking the “upload” button.
 

Social Media

 
From a marketing standpoint, social media presence is imperative for business growth. Sharing your photos with visitors on Flickr, Facebook and Pinterest can offer a boost in sales or audience that you wouldn’t be able to obtain otherwise.
 
Even if you take photos as a hobby and not a career, chances are that you’re sharing them with your friends on your personal social media sites.
 
Many have speculated about social media sites and their Terms of Service that state they have certain rights to your content. Most of these have been disputed and the sites have assured users that their content rights belong to them. Facebook’s Terms of Service, for instance, state that you are granting them a license to use that content to display to the audience you’ve shared it with. In other words, you aren’t granting them a license to use your photos as they see fit.
 
By Dominik Schröder
By Dominik Schröder

 
The bigger issue with social media is the privacy settings. Your page may be completely private as far as the settings go, but you still have a profile picture and you can still find your photo via hashtag search.
 
The main point to keep in mind is that your photos on social media are not safe, regardless of your privacy settings. Also keep your photo content in mind. Environmental shots being stolen and portraits being stolen are equally illegal but have different ramifications for the subject and photographer.
 

Imitation is NOT the Sincerest Form of Flattery

 
There are many articles out there about image sharing and photographers being grateful if their image is shared without regard for crediting or copyright. This is the idea that image theft is flattering and talent validating; if someone goes through the trouble to steal your photo it must be a great shot.
 
This logic has too many holes to discuss all them. The bottom line is that using a photo without permission or crediting the source is theft. For many photographers their photos are their livelihood and stealing their work is taking money directly from them. And depending on the license, attribution isn’t enough to use the photo.
 
By Jeremy Ricketts
By Jeremy Ricketts

 
Consider where your photos are being used. If you aren’t trying to protect your photos in some way, you are opening up your photography to a variety of thieves. You may not be affected negatively if your photo is stolen and used for a T-shirt print or a blog article, but what if your photo is used in an advertisement for an adult film site?
 
This is a very real risk and has happened many times, especially with photos shared on social media. Do not allow your photos to be used without your consent whether it be personal or professional photography. The risk of stolen photos is not just damaging from a fiscal standpoint.
 

Copyrights and Credits

 
The good news is that your photos are automatically copyrighted. The second the shutter closes copyright is already attached to your photo. Unfortunately, registration is required in order to enforce your rights, usually it must be within the first three months it was created, and it requires a fee.
 
Because of this, you can contact anyone who has used your photo and demand they stop using it. Photographers might need to jump through some hoops if the case goes to court, but luckily the automatic copyright will force them to stop using the photo. Compensation, on the other hand, might be a different story if you haven’t registered your work.
 
By Breno Machado
By Breno Machado
 
For those who aren’t as concerned about redistribution for their photography, there are six different Creative Commons licenses that will inform those using your photos what is allowed and what isn’t.
 
The important thing is to be clear on how you want your photos to be used so users are aware if you want to be attributed or if you don’t allow your photo to be used whatsoever. This is an important distinction to make for professional photographers especially.
 

Tips to Help

 
There are many ways to help combat photo theft online. Some popular options are watermarking photos, only uploading low-resolution photos, splicing photos, disabling right-click functions, or layering images. Try using software that is easily downloaded and can protect your photos in bulk.
 
It will help by automatically adding watermarks, copyright disclaimers, invisible disclaimers or reduce image quality to the photos you would like to put online. All of these options require the thief to work harder for the photo, but doesn’t protect it completely. Altering the photo on an online platform is at least a way to advertise your product without giving it away, unless the thief wants to work hard for it.
 
by Chelsea Francis
by Chelsea Francis

 
You can also consider the platform that you put your photos on. Creating a website that requires a log-in to view photos or payment to download full-resolution photos might be a better option than putting photos on Flickr where some users assume a Creative Commons license when you might prefer a stricter copyright license.
 
Putting photos on a personal blog and not on a social media site can help keep your photos on a smaller stage where they aren’t in such a big search pool for thieves seeking personal photos.
 
Uploading your photos online is great for marketing your photography, showcasing your skill to other photographers, sharing personal photos with friends and family, or getting your name out there as a photographer.
 
The digital age is both a blessing for the creative world and a curse because of the ease at which someone can steal your work, but luckily there are a variety of different ways to protect yourself.
 
Being aware of the power of social media, what can happen with stolen photos, copyright rules, and how to keep your photos safe will better prepare you for the online world and how it relates to your photography. What has your experience been with online image theft?
 

Image compression: File types – RAW, S-RAW, M-RAW and JPEG

RAW


A RAW file is the image data exactly as captured on the sensor. Any settings you apply in white balance, Picture Styles and some other areas are only appended to the image as a small header file. This means they can be changed later in RAW conversion software such as Canon’s Digital Photo Professional (supplied with the camera).
 
A RAW file is often referred to as a ‘digital negative’ because the data can be processed and printed in different ways to produce different results – just like the negative from a film camera. Also, like a film negative, the RAW file never changes. When you open a RAW file in a software application, it is actually a copy of the data which opens. When you save this, it creates a new file on your computer. The original RAW file can then be opened again (as another copy) and worked on to produce a completely different result.
Advantages
  • Can be modified after capture
  • Maximum flexibility
  • Widest range of colours recorded
Disadvantages
  • Largest file size
  • Needs computer for processing

 

S-RAW


Introduced with the EOS-1D Mark III, S-RAW provides all the advantages of a RAW file, but in a smaller file size. An S-RAW file has approximately one-fourth the pixel count and approximately half the file size of a RAW image. Just like RAW images, S-RAW images can be adjusted and processed with Digital Photo Professional software (supplied with the camera). S-RAW will appeal to wedding photographers, for example, who do not need full resolution for wedding candids, but who do need the post-production control RAW offers.
Advantages
  • Smaller file size than RAW (so more images can be captured to a media card)
Disadvantages
  • Lower resolution than RAW

 

M-RAW

 
Introduced with the EOS 7D, and also on the EOS-1D Mark IV, M-RAW provides all the advantages of a RAW file, but in a smaller file size. Depending on the camera an M-RAW file has approximately between 55-60% of the pixel count and approximately two thirds the file size of a RAW image. Like RAW images, M-RAW images can be adjusted and processed with Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software (free in the box with the camera).
 
Shooting M-RAW files might appeal to wedding photographers who don’t need full resolution for wedding candids, but who do want the post-production control that RAW offers. It could also be of use to sports/action photographers who will get an increase in the number of frames when shooting in bursts due to using a smaller file size. M-RAW is also worth considering if you are not planning to make prints larger than A3 size.
Advantages
  • Smaller file size than RAW (so more images can be captured to a media card).
  • Increased burst shooting possibilities.
Disadvantages
  • Lower resolution than RAW.

 

JPEG


A JPEG image file is a RAW file that has been converted by the in-camera DIGIC processor and saved as a compressed file. It can be saved at different image sizes and levels of compression to give different file sizes. The camera takes the RAW file and applies the camera parameter or Picture Style settings to the image to create a new file.
 
These settings cannot be changed once the JPEG file has been saved. It is possible to make some colour and exposure changes to a JPEG file, but you will be working at 8-bit depth rather than the 12-bit or 14-bit depth offered by EOS digital cameras.
 
This may not be a problem if you are making minor changes to the file and printing at sizes up to A4, but it might be significant with large changes or bigger prints. Also, a JPEG file is compressed each time it is edited and saved, and can lose some data each time.
 
There are two aspects to every JPEG file: Large, Medium and Small refers to the image size (the number of pixels recorded); Fine and Normal refers to the amount of compression used when saving the file. Large/Fine gives the maximum quality; Small/Normal the lowest.
Advantages
  • Smaller file sizes (more images can be stored on a CF or SD card)
  • Images are easy to view, mail and print than RAW files
Disadvantages
  • Reduced post-processing flexibility
  • Reduced colour depth and resolution
  • Need to get everything correct in-camera (some computer processing is possible)
http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/education/infobank/image_compression/file_types_raw_sraw_and_jpeg.do

Not Sure How Your Home Page Should Look? Here Are 10 Things to Include

How should the home page on your website look? What features should you include and what should go where?
 
You could of course go with something completely different from the norm but if you want something tried and tested that you know will deliver results you just need to take a look at some of the world’s most successful companies.
 
Go Globe have put together the infographic below showing the layout trends of the Fortune 500 companies websites.
 
Not Sure How Your Home Page Should Look Here Are 10 Things to Include